zinc anodes

Zimar Shaft Zinc Anodes - Standard

Zimar shaft zinc anodes meet the standards set for...

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Zimar Shaft Zinc Anodes - Standard
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Zimar shaft zinc anodes meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. All Zimar shaft zinc anodes include copper contacts for permanent ground and stainless screws with washer retainers. Zimar Shaft Zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better. There is a r... Prices Starting At: $6.94

Zimar Shaft Zinc Anodes - Metric

Zimar shaft zincs meet the standards set forth by ...

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Zimar Shaft Zinc Anodes - Metric
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Zimar shaft zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. All Zimar metric shaft zinc anodes include copper contacts for permanent ground and stainless screws with washer retainers. Zimar metric shaft zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better. Prices Starting At: $8.12

Zimar Single Bolt Clamp Rudder Zincs

Zimar rudder zincs meet the standards set forth by...

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Zimar Single Bolt Clamp Rudder Zincs
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Zimar rudder zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. All Zimar rudder zinc anodes include copper contacts for permanent ground and a stainless screw. Zimar Rudder Zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better. Most discerning boat owners choose Zima... Prices Starting At: $5.68

Zimar Bolt on (drilled) Plate Zincs

All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensi...

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Zimar Bolt on (drilled) Plate Zincs
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All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensions with specified bolt patterns. These Zimar plate zincs are pre-drilled for bolt-on attachment. Zimar plate zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001 Zimar Plate Zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection jo... Prices Starting At: $8.52

Zimar Bolt on (undrilled) Plate Zincs

All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensi...

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Zimar Bolt on (undrilled) Plate Zincs
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All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensions. Zincs are undrilled to allow for consumer to drill specific patterns for fastening. Zimar plate zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. Zimar Plate Zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better.... Prices Starting At: $5.55

Zimar Weld on Plate Zinc Anodes

All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensi...

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Zimar Weld on Plate Zinc Anodes
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All Zimar plate zinc anodes are cut as per dimensions with galvanized steel mounting strips for easy welding or drilling. Zimar plate zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. Zimar Plate Zincs weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better. Prices Starting At: $17.44

Zimar Bolt on Round Plate Zincs

All round plate Zimar zinc anodes are cast with bo...

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Zimar Bolt on Round Plate Zincs
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All round plate Zimar zinc anodes are cast with bolt hole predrilled on center for easy mounting on hull. Zimar round plate zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. Zimar Round Plate Zinc Anodes weigh more than the competition, and peform their cathodic protection job better. Prices Starting At: $9.71

Zimar Prop and Bow Thruster Nut Zincs

These Zimar nut zinc anodes are precision machined...

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Zimar Prop and Bow Thruster Nut Zincs
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These Zimar nut zinc anodes are precision machined to fit over specific nut configurations and models. Zimar zinc anodes are individually made to assure highest possible zinc concentration and lowest amount of porosity in the zinc market. Zimar nut zincs meet the standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. ... Prices Starting At: $11.99

For boat owners around the globe, Deep Blue Yacht Supply is your trusted source for the best zinc anodes in the marine industry. We are committed to providing the best zinc anodes, at the lowest prices, with superior customer service.

Zimar Zinc Anodes set the standard when it comes to cathodic protection. Zimar Zinc Anodes meet all standards set forth by Mil-Spec A-18001K, Mil-Spec A-18001A, and Mil-Spec A-18001. Zimar Zincs are individually hand poured to assure the highest possible zinc concentration and lowest amount of porosity.

Trust Deep Blue Yacht Supply to help equip your boat with the best possible zinc anodes. Deep Blue Yacht Supply is able to provide the ultimate sales and service experience, when it comes to selecting the best zinc anodes to protect your investment against corrosion. Deep Blue Yacht Supply has a huge inventory of the best Shaft Zincs, Plate Zincs, Rudder Zincs, Nut Zincs, etc.

Seawater is inherently corrosive and this is even more pronounced in the case of components that are made of two different metals. Any time two metals are in contact in seawater they will form a battery and one of the two metals will give up its electrons to create the current that flows between the two metals. This process is known as galvanic corrosion and unless you want your boat to begin failing you it is important that we halt this process before it begins. This is done by using a third metal which will more readily give up electrons to create a current. In boating, zinc is most commonly used and the zinc pieces are called zinc anodes, or more commonly just zincs.

Zinc anodes are used on boats anywhere two metals come in contact with each other and are thus subject to galvanic corrosion. This is most common with a stainless steel shaft and aluminum propeller, but there are many other places where two different metals come in contact on a boat. Without the protection of a zinc anode you risk corrosion seriously affecting your parts and components.

Some people think that as long as zinc is present it will protect the other metals on their boats, however they soon learn to their chagrin that this is not true. You can not protect your metal components by simply hanging a piece of zinc over the side of the boat, the zinc anodes must be in contact with the metals they are protecting. This isn't a big deal though as boat and engine manufactures have designed parts to allow for the inclusion of zinc anodes, from the zinc collar that goes around your shaft to the zinc hull plates that are used to protect bronze through-hull fittings to the various zincs in an engine there is typically a protection wherever there are two metals with the possibility of galvanic corrosion occurring.

Now that you know about the importance of zinc anodes it should also be stressed that these anodes do not last forever. Because they are sacrificing themselves to protect your more important metal parts they corrode themselves and are slowly worn down. As a rule of thumb the zinc anodes should be roughly 1% of the surface area they are protecting and should only need to be replaced annually. To be safe though you should inspect all your metal parts regularly for signs of corrosion and if any is present replace your zincs immediately. Typically zincs are replaced when they are only half consumed. Once they go beyond this they are significantly less effective and you risk damage to the parts you are trying to protect.

The good news is that zinc anodes are not expensive, many cost just several dollars and even larger hull plates can be had for under $30 in many cases. When installing zinc anodes be sure that they are in contact with the metal being protected, do not paint the surface of the zinc and make sure that both the zinc and other metal surface are bare and bright before installing the anode. In the case of your engine you should refer to the owner’s manual to be sure you know the location of all the zincs, some can be difficult to locate if you aren't aware that they are there.

It is good that there is a way to protect your metal parts, but the protection only lasts as long as you keep your zinc anodes bigger than half depleted. Make it a habit to check for corrosion regularly and replace those zincs when they are half depleted.

Zinc Anodes Protects Metals from Corrosion

One unfortunate side effect of immersing metals in seawater is corrosion. A specific type of decay known as galvanic corrosion can happen when two kinds of metal are connected and then exposed to salt water.  In layman’s terms, this causes the metals to behave in a battery-like fashion; current will begin to flow between them as electrons from the atoms of one of the metals are converted into metal ions and lost into the seawater.  Galvanic corrosion usually proceeds at a rapid pace and destroys the metals involved.

This is obviously a large problem for boaters.  Propellers are frequently mounted on shafts made of stainless steel, but those same propellers are themselves made of other metals such as aluminum or alloys such as bronze.

Avoiding Galvanic Corrosion: The Role of Anodes

In order to avoid forming a battery circuit, designers of boats and motors have long used the technique of the anode.  This involves providing a third type of metal such as zinc, which is placed in electrical contact with the other two metals involved.  Designed to be “sacrificed,” this third metal has inherent qualities that cause it to readily lose electrons.  Since nature takes the path of least resistance, the zinc anodes will decay and eventually be replaced so that shafts and propellers can remain pristine.

Boat zincs can also help to protect other watercraft elements such as rudders and hull plates.  These zincs take a variety of forms including round plates, rectangular plates, and cylinders designed to encircle a propeller shaft.

Zinc anodes provide the saltwater protection you need

Regardless of how familiar you are with the science behind the corrosion of metal, you probably know quite well the end results: rust and loss of material. Zinc anodes are used as part of a protection system that helps to defend metal structures that are buried or submerged against erosion. They are most often used for structures like barges, buried storage containers, docks, harbors, piers, ships, tankers, and underground or underwater pipelines.

Galvanic anodes, or sacrificial anodes, are always made of some type of metal alloy. This may seem counter-intuitive, but the idea behind it is that making the anode out of a metal substance whose voltage is more “active” than that of the structure it protects ensures that the material of the anode will be expended in predilection to that of the structure. To say that the anode has a more “active” voltage means that the anode is more negatively electrochemically charged than the material it is designed to protect. The anode’s greater negative potential in comparison to the underlying material makes it more susceptible to corrosion first, thus leaving the underlying material unscathed for significantly longer than if it were left exposed.

Zinc is just one of the three alloys most often used in making galvanic anodes, along with aluminum and magnesium. Any of the three materials are available in various forms like blocks, extruded ribbon, plates, or rods. Each material also has its own set of benefits and drawbacks. Zinc is considered to be a fairly reliable material and is well-suited for low-resistivity salt water. It is often used for boat and ship hulls, offshore pipelines, propellers and rudders, and inside storage tanks.

Zinc is not, however, suitable for use in high temperatures. At higher temperatures, zinc has a tendency to passivate, or become less negative. If an anode’s negative charge weakens, the current may become disrupted and the anode no longer functional. Zinc also has a comparatively low driving voltage. This means that it generally does not provide a current that is sufficient for holding up in high-resistivity soil. In some cases, though, this circumstantial drawback can turn out to be an advantage. In situations where hydrogen embrittlement (damage to the protected material as a result of hydrogen exposure, which is naturally produced during the corrosion process) is a possibility, lower-voltage zinc anodes may work better to avoid undesirable over-protection.

All about electrochemical reactions and zinc anodes

Storage tank systems, metallic pipelines, and other submerged structures of metallic nature are protected from corrosion by employing the electrochemical principle governing galvanic anodes such as the very common zinc anode. The idea lies on the physical phenomenon of electrochemical reaction wherein a dissimilar metal pair submerged in a conductive electrolyte such as seawater tends to form an electrical circuit. On this circuit, the metal with a more active voltage becomes the anode where corrosion would occur; the other metallic component with a less active voltage becomes the cathode. Due to the current originating from the anode to the electrolyte and onto the surface of the cathode, the latter is protected from corrosion.

In practical applications, the galvanic anode is also referred to as the sacrificial anode since it is purposely installed to be sacrificed in order to save the metallic cathode; thus, the latter is said to have received cathodic protection. For the anode material to be effective in the electrochemical system, it must be marginally more active than the cathode material. In most practical cases, the use of zinc anode suffices most applications. Aside from the intrinsic metallic properties checked basically for suitability, the physical dimensions and installation methods as well are important considerations.

Submerged metallic systems prefer the protection offered by galvanic anodes because virtually no power is required. Additionally, installation costs are very minimal since the only crucial requirement is that the zinc anode must be installed near the structure to be protected with enough proximity to form the required electrochemical reaction. As long as the anode is installed properly on the structure, less maintenance is needed on account of the fact that this type of system is not prone to electrical or mechanical malfunction.

Although the cathodic protection system comes with a number of benefits, certain limitations somehow beset the galvanic system due to the naturally small driving potential. In systems where there is a high resistivity area separating the cathode and the anode, galvanic protection is ineffective. Large and poorly coated structures are among the limitations of the system.

Aside from the zinc anode material, magnesium and aluminum are also popular choices for the anode. On applications with high resistivity, magnesium or certain alloy of the metal is preferred due to its highly negative electrical potential. Nonetheless, overly negative potential results to disbanding of the coated surface. On the other hand, aluminum is recommended for applications requiring lightweight structures. However, this metal is easily passivated in the presence of other chemicals particularly chlorine. In conclusion, zinc anode is generally the optimal choice except in high-temperature applications.

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